The 5 Best Firewood Carts (With Wheels)

Firewood Cart

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Firewood carts are specifically designed for hauling wood. They typically have open sides which allow for varying sizes of logs whereas something like a wheelbarrow does not.

Now, you can certainly use a wheelbarrow to transport your firewood back and forth but not as efficiently as you can with a firewood cart.

Most wheelbarrows only have one wheel which means you’ll have to balance the load with both your hands at all times. Loading enough firewood into the wheelbarrow to make it worth the trip can be a tricky task, too.

The logs don’t fit nicely and once again, you have to hold both handles so the wheelbarrow doesn’t tip over. This problem is worsened if you’re going up or down a hill.

That’s where the firewood cart comes in. It fixes all these problems. With two wheels, you won’t don’t need to worry about it tipping over as much. You can pull it with one hand if you so desire. Oh, and it doesn’t matter what size firewood you’re using because of the open sides.

Imagine packing 150 – 200 lbs of firewood into a single cart and use it like a dolly. That’s basically how they work; simply lean the cart back and begin pulling.

The cart bears the load of the firewood and all you have to do is pull (or push). Pull it right through your front door and straight to your fireplace if you want. That’s what a firewood cart is designed to do. And this article is meant to help you find the best firewood cart for you.

ImageWeightName
Sunnydaze Firewood Cart21 lbsSunnydaze Firewood Log Cart
Vogelzang LC-37 Log Cart42 lbsVogelzang LC-37 Log Cart
Plow & Hearth Wood Caddy19 lbsPlow & Hearth Wood Caddy
Gorilla Carts Wagon32 lbsGorilla Carts Wagon
Shelterlogic Firewood Cart25 lbsShelter Logic Firewood Cart
All links in this table go to Amazon.

How to Choose a Firewood Cart

When choosing a firewood cart, there are just a few things to keep in mind. Because they’re all very similar in design, you’ll want to pay attention to the details. The materials it’s made from, size of wheels, weight, dimensions, and the price.

The materials affect the overall weight of the cart and how long it’s going to last. A lot of them are made from tubular steel while others are solid or galvanized steel. The ones crafted from solid steel are more sturdy but they’re heavier.

  1. Materials
  2. Wheel Size
  3. Dimensions
  4. Price

Another aspect to consider is the size of the wheels. This is especially important for people going up or down stairs or across rough terrains. Naturally, something with bigger wheels will be more suitable for these situations.

Keep in mind, however, tall wheels are usually thin. This can pose a problem when going over soft soil or snow. Consider your location and climate before making a decision on the type of wheels you need.

The dimensions of the firewood cart are important because you’ll want to ensure it will fit through all the opening you need it to. For those of you wanting to roll your cart through your back door, just be sure the width of the cart is small enough to fit through. Otherwise, the only real concern you may have with the dimensions is just how much firewood you carry in a single load. The more the better, right?

Finally, the price of the cart is something to consider, too. There isn’t a huge difference in price with the five carts on this page. Most firewood carts range between $50 – $150.

The Best Firewood Carts Reviewed

Now that you know what to look for in a firewood cart, I encourage you to take a few minutes and think about your specific needs. That will help you in selecting one of the following products below. Once you’re ready, let’s get started.

Sunnydaze Firewood Log Cart

Sunnydaze Firewood Cart

The Firewood log cart from Sunnydaze is a great option for most people. Notice the small, 10″ rubber wheels and tubular steel design. It’s one of the most light-weight log carriers on this page, coming in around 21 lbs.

Also, you have the option of buying just the cart or the cart and cover combo. Personally, I don’t think the cover is needed but if you plan to leave wood on the cart for a few days, you may want to consider getting the combo.

Another reason I would shy away from using the cover is the same reason I don’t recommend covering firewood with a tarp; it promotes mold growth when covered for too long. Anyway, some of the specs are listed below.

  • Height: 42″
  • Width: 21.5″
  • Depth: 26″
  • Weight: 21 lbs
  • Holds: 1/8 face cord
  • Warranty: 1 year
  • Construct: Tubular Steel
  • Wheel Size: 10″

It has a light, sturdy design with wide tires. This cart is great for just about everyone but especially those of you who get a lot of snow. Wide tires will perform better in snow and soft soil than tall, thin tires. This is the firewood cart I recommend for most people.


Vogelzang LC-37 Log Cart

Vogelzang LC-37 Log Cart

This is easily one of the best looking firewood carts on the list. It sports a steel frame (not tubular) which means it’s sturdy but kind of heavy. At least by comparison. It has thin, 10″ rubber wheels and carries roughly 50 lbs of firewood per load.

So, this cart has its pros and cons for sure. I like the heavy-duty construction and the overall appearance but the slender wheels and the small amount of wood it carries is concerning. 

You can’t carry as much firewood per load and the wheels may pose a problem on soft ground. Having said that, if you’ll mostly be on sidewalks or pavement, the Vogelzang might be an appealing choice for you. I’ll list the specifications below.

  • Height: 45″
  • Width: 13.5″
  • Depth: 16″
  • Weight: 42 lbs
  • Holds: 50-lbs of firewood
  • Warranty: none
  • Construct: Steel
  • Wheel Size: 10″

The heavy, steel construction will ensure this cart will last you for years to come but the small amount of firewood it holds will be a drawback for most people. On the other hand, it has a rustic design that many people like.


Plow & Hearth Wood Caddy

Plow & Hearth Wood Caddy

The wood caddy from Plow & Hearth is a dream-come-true for some people. The reason? It can carry a lot of firewood and, of course, the large, 18″ wheels. Obviously, this isn’t a good choice for those of you dealing with soft ground and snow but for of you traversing staircases and unruly terrains, look no further.

The large wheels make pulling this cart over bumps and steps easier than usual. Also, the wood caddy has a lightweight, tubular steel design; it is the lightest cart on the list. Not only that, it still manages to hold a staggering 150 lbs of firewood. Anyway, here are some of the specs.

  • Height: 43″
  • Width: 26″
  • Depth: 28″
  • Weight: 19 lbs
  • Holds: 150-lbs of firewood
  • Warranty: none
  • Construct: Galvanized Steel
  • Wheel Size: 18″

This is certainly a cart to consider if you’re looking for one with large wheels. The amount of firewood you can transport is about as good as it gets and large wheels are great going up and down stairs.


Gorilla Carts Wagon

Gorilla Carts Wagon

Okay, I know I talked bad about wheelbarrows at the beginning of this page but what about a wagon? This one has four wheels so it’s not like a typical wheelbarrow. Most importantly, it’s 18″ in width, which is wide enough to hold most standard-sized pieces of firewood (which are 16″). Not only that but it can hold roughly 400 lbs whatever you put into it!

It won’t pretend this is perfect but it has some major benefits. Let’s start with the faults. Obviously, this isn’t a firewood cart. You can’t easily pull this up a small flight of stairs if you need to and it’s kind of big.

If you stack your firewood too high, it’s probably going to fall out when you start moving the wagon. I’m sure you can think of a few more drawbacks if you try hard enough but what about the benefits?

Well, for starters, it can hold a lot of weight. It can safely transport about as much firewood as you can fit into it. It’s a great option to pull across soft ground and snow, due to its four, wide tires. Unlike wheelbarrows, you don’t have to balance it. You can pull the cart with one hand if you want to!

Last but not least, you can use this wagon for more than hauling firewood. With the other carts on this list, you can’t do much with them aside from transporting logs. This Gorilla Cart can be used for a variety of different reasons.

  • Bed Size: 24″ x 18″
  • Weight: 38 lbs
  • Holds: 400-lbs
  • Warranty: 1-year limited warranty
  • Construct: Steel
  • Wheel Size: 10″

So, for those of you with relatively flat yards and no stairs to traverse, this Gorilla Cart is a viable option. Not only will it haul your firewood but you can use it for other things as well.


ShelterLogic Firewood Cart

Shelterlogic Firewood Cart

The final firewood cart on this list is from ShelterLogic. It’s very similar in comparison to the Sunnydaze cart but with some small differences. To begin with, it’s slightly smaller by a few inches. Also, it doesn’t seem to have a warranty; at least not one I could find online.

One problem that seems to crop up with this cart is that while the frame is rated to hold 250-lbs, the wheels can’t always bear the load. Perhaps it’s a fluke but there are a few people complaining about the wheels having issues after hauling a few really big loads. Here are some of the specs.

  • Height: 38″
  • Width: 21″
  • Depth: 24″
  • Weight: 25 lbs
  • Holds: 250-lbs
  • Warranty: none
  • Construct: Tubular Steel
  • Wheel Size: 10″

Other than occasional load bearing problems, this is a great firewood cart all around. It’s similar to the Sunnydaze cart and has mostly positive reviews across the board. It’s also one of the cheapest options on this list.


Frequently Asked Questions

This section is meant to answer some of the most frequently asked questions about firewood carts.

How to move a stack of firewood?

Firewood carts or caddies are a good option for a small stack of wood. A wagon is a decent option as well. However, if you’re moving a bunch of logs, it may be worth your time to simply load them into the back of a truck in order to move more logs at the same time.

Do firewood carts last a long time?

Provided you’re caring for the cart, it will last many, many years. My best advice is to store the cart inside, away from the elements. Occasional maintenance will prove worth your time as well.

How many logs will a firewood card carry?

This depends on the brand you purchase. Some carts will safely carry several hundred lbs while others are only rated for 100 lbs or less. The better question is, how many logs are you willing to transport in a single trip? Also, if you only need the cart for carrying logs from the stack to your fireplace, you probably don’t need a large firewood cart. Find one that suits your needs and pay close attention to the weight it carries. Most of them will safely carry 100+ lbs of wood.

Do wheelbarrows work good for firewood?

Yep! A wheelbarrow with two wheels works best! Using a wheelbarrow with one wheel can be problematic for transporting firewood because the weight can cause the wheelbarrow to tip towards one side or the other. For this reason, a barrow with two wheels is best for transporting many logs.
Wheelbarrow with Firewood

TLDR; Which Firewood Cart is the Best?

Firewood carts are undoubtedly better at hauling logs than wheelbarrows. They’re sure to save you some frustration should you decide to get one.

I’m confident that the carts listed on this page will make your life easier when it comes to hauling wood. All you have to do is decide which one is best for you.

Something with large wheels is fitting for those of you who need to haul firewood across wild terrain or up and down stairs. Carts with short, wide tires are more fitting in environments with a soft ground and lots of snow. Don’t forget the Gorilla cart, either; it’s a viable option especially if you can use it for more than just hauling firewood.

I recommend the Sunnydaze firewood cart or the wood caddy from Plow & Hearth. Both are lightweight and they’re capable of carrying a lot of wood.

On the other hand, the Vogelzang is great for transporting small amounts of firewood and the heavy-duty design will last you a long time. Each one has its pros and cons, that’s for sure.

One Comment

  • I will just mention that “kiln dried” firewood means that someone has burned fossil fuels to get your firewood dry. For anyone looking to burn firewood to reduce their carbon footprint this is counterproductive. I know that it’s not everyone’s primary concern, but food for thought when simply buying a year earlier and leaving the wood to sit more or less accomplishes the exact same thing without the waste.

    Enjoying the site.

    Reply

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